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Bring new perspectives to your area of study and broaden your career opportunities by adding a minor.

The School offers three undergraduate minors that provide you the opportunity to go outside your selected major and explore new ideas, skills and ways of thinking.

Science, Technology, Ethics and Policy (STEP)

The STEP minor is an interdisciplinary program sponsored by the School of Public Policy, the College of Information Science, and the A. James Clark School of Engineering. It offers you the knowledge and analytical skills to understand and assess the complex interactions among science, technology, ethics and policy. 

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Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation

Engage in hands-on learning to enhance your knowledge of local, national and global issues by minoring in Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation. You will examine different approaches to social impact and study the role of the nonprofit, non-governmental and social sectors, in addition to social innovation, leadership and nonprofit management skills. Students study the role of the nonprofit, NGO, and social sector, as well as social innovation, leadership, and the skills required for effective nonprofit management. 

The Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation minor requires the completion of at least 15 credits, including 3 core courses and 2 elective courses. No course may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one minor, and at least nine credits must be at the 300-400 level. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better.

This minor is open to all undergraduates on campus, regardless of major. Students who want to take a deeper dive, can pursue the Major in Public Policy with a focus on Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation.

You must complete the following courses:

  • PLCY213 Foundations of Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation
  • PLCY310 Nonprofit Leadership and Social Innovation in Action

And one of the following:

  • PLCY215 Innovation and Social Change: Creating Change for Good
  • PLCY380 Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
  • BSOS388B Behavioral and Social Sciences Special Topics: Innovation and Social Change - Do Good Now
  • ARHU380: Arts & Humanities in Social Innovation, Change, and Justice: Do Good Now
  • HONR348D Advanced Honors Seminar: Innovation and Social Change - Do Good Now
  • ENME467 Engineering for Social Change

Full list of approved courses that you can use to satisfy the elective course requirement:

  • AASP101 Public Policy and the Black Community
  • AASP187 The New Jim Crow: African-Americans, Mass Incarceration and the Prison Industrial Complex
  • AASP301 Applied Policy Analysis and the Black Community
  • AASP468A Social Inequalities and Health in the African Diaspora
  • AGNR301 Sustainability
  • AMST418G Food, Trauma, and Sustainability
  • ANTH264 Immigration Policy, Immigrant Lives
  • ANTH265 Anthropology of Global Health
  • ANTH266 Changing Climate, Changing Cultures
  • ARCH272 Sustainability at College Park
  • AREC200 The Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem: Intersection of Science, Economics, and Policy
  • AREC365 World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies
  • BMGT350 Marketing Principles and Organization
  • BMGT355 Foundations of Marketing for NonBusiness Majors
  • BMGT468U Special Topics in Management and Organization; Fearless Founders: Social Entrepreneurship Laboratory
  • BMGT468W Special Topics in Management and Organization; Social Innovation Practicum: Consulting and Venture Creation
  • BSCV191 Introduction to Civicus
  • BSOS388F/GVPT388B Behavioral and Social Sciences Special Topics; Innovation in the Public
  • CCJS325 Slavery in the Twenty First Century: Combating Human Trafficking
  • CMLT279 Global Literature and Social Change
  • COMM 498 Seminar; Public Relations and Corporate Social Responsibility
  • EDCP220 Introduction to Human Diversity in Social Institutions
  • EDHD230 Human Development and Societal Institutions
  • ENCE215 Engineering for Sustainability
  • ENGL292 Writing for Change
  • ENGL361 Recovering Oral Histories
  • ENGL395 Writing for Health Professions
  • ENGL398B Topics in Professional Writing; Writing for Social Entrepreneurship
  • ENGL398N Topics in Professional Writing; Writing for Non-Profit Organizations
  • ENSP340 Water: Science, Ethics, and Policy
  • ENSP342 Environmental Threats to Oceans and Coasts: Towards an Integrated Policy Response
  • ENSP360 Every Drop Counts: Water, Food, and Global Public Health
  • ENST282 Ecological Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • FMSC383 Special Topics in Public Policy, Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now
  • GEOG110 The World Today: Global Perspectives
  • GEOG130 Developing Countries
  • GEOG202 Introduction to Human Geography
  • GEOG330 As the World Turns: Society and Sustainability in a Time of Great Change
  • GEOG331 Introduction to Human Dimensions of Global Change
  • GEOG332 Economic Geography
  • GEOG333 The Social Geography of Metropolitan Areas in Global Perspective
  • GEOG413 Migration: Latin America and the United States
  • GEOG421 Changing Geographies of China
  • GEOG423 Latin America
  • GEOG430 Selected Topics in Human Geography; Climate, Energy, and Policy
  • GEOG431 Culture and Natural Resource Management
  • GVPT388B Topical Investigations; Innovation in the Public Sector
  • HEIP144 Contemporary Issues in Entrepreneurship and Innovation
  • HLSA484 Redesigning Health Care: Developing a Clinic to Meet Community Needs
  • HONR349 Leading and Investing in Social Change: Re - defining and Experimenting with Philanthropy
  • JWST429M Advanced Topics in Jewish Studies; American Jewry and Public Policy
  • LARC151 Urban Agriculture: Designing and Assessing Edible Landscapes
  • LASC248B Special Topics in Latin American Studies; Environmental Crisis in Latin America
  • MIEH330 Environmental Justice, Racism, and Environmental Health Disparities
  • MIEH331 The Built Environment, Sustainability, and Public Health
  • PHSC430 Public Health in the City: Perspectives on Health in the Urban Environment
  • PLCY201 Public Leaders and Active Citizens
  • PLCY214 Leading and Investing in Social Change: Redefining and Experimenting with Philanthropy
  • PLCY288A Introduction to Public Policy Topics: 21st Century Racial Justice and Gender from the Bullhorn to the Ballot
  • PLCY288B Introduction to Public Policy Topics: The Impact of Discriminatory Housing Policies on the Black Community
  • PLCY302 Examining Pluralism in Public Policy
  • PLCY359I Leading and Investing in Social Change: Redefining and Experimenting with Philanthropy
  • PLCY388G Global Perspectives on Leading and Investing in Social Change
  • PLCY388Z Special Topics in Public Policy: Race, Capitalism & the Wealth Gap
  • PLSC125 Feeding Nine Billion by 2050: Food Security and Crop Protection
  1. Complete the application form [.docx] (electronically or handwritten) and email it to nplminor@umd.edu
  2. Schedule a mandatory advising appointment during advising hours.
Questions?

Contact us at nplminor@umd.edu or visit us during office hours.


Public Leadership

Explore the complex issues that face leaders around the world by minoring in Public Leadership. You will be empowered to think critically about the solutions needed for a range of pressing problems, examining such issues as democratization and human rights, crime and punishment, diversity and affirmative action, and poverty and inequality. In addition to exploring the issues, you will engage in critical questions and learning about leadership for the public good and effective citizenship.

The Public Leadership minor requires the completion of 15 credits, including 3 credits of core courses, 6 credits of signature courses and 6 credits of elective courses. No course may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one minor, and no more than 6 credits may overlap between your major and the Public Leadership minor (unless otherwise approved by your major). At least nine credits must be at the 300-400 level. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better, and a minimum C (2.00) cumulative grade point average across all courses used to satisfy the minor is required.

You must complete one of the following:

  • PLCY201 Public Leaders and Active Citizens
  • PLCY302 Examining Pluralism in Public Policy

PLCY288A: Introduction to Public Policy Topics: 21st Century Racial Justice and Gender from the Bullhorn to the Ballot

PLCY288B: Introduction to Public Policy Topics: The Impact of Discriminatory Housing Policies on the Black Community

PLCY309: Internship in Political Institutions: State and Local

PLCY311: Women in Leadership 3

PLCY313: Advocacy in the American Political System

PLCY359T: Human Rights, Security, and Development in Morocco

PLCY380: Special Topics in Public Policy- Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now

PLCY388A: Special Topics in Public Policy; Child and Family Policy Impact

PLCY388F: Special Topics in Public Policy; Contemporary Issues Under the Rule of Law

PLCY388G: Global Perspectives on Leading and Investing in Social Change

PLCY388I: Special Topics in Public Policy; Child and Family Advocacy Impact

PLCY388P: Special Topics in Public Policy; U.S. Immigration Policy: A Retrospective & Contemporary Review of Policy

PLCY388Z: Special Topics in Public Policy: Race, Capitalism & the Wealth Gap

HONR348D: Advanced Honors Seminar; Innovation and Social Change: Do Good Now

AASP101: Public Policy and the Black Community

AASP314: The Civil Rights Movement

AMST202: Cultures of Everyday Life in America

AMST212: Diversity in American Culture

HESI217: Introduction to Student Leadership

HESI315: Leadership in Groups and Organizations

HESI318: Applied Contextual Leadership Series

HESI418: Leadership and Identity Series

HIST222: Immigration and Ethnicity in America

LASC234: Issues in Latin American Studies I

LASC235: Issues in Latin American Studies II

PSYC221: Social Psychology

PSYC362: Introduction to Negotiation

PSYC424: Communication and Persuasion

SOCY432: Social Movements

SOCY425/ WMST425: Gender Roles and Social Institutions

  1. Complete the application form (electronically or handwritten) and email it to plminor@umd.edu
  2. Schedule a mandatory advising appointment during advising hours.

Questions?

Contact us at plminor@umd.edu or visit us during office hours.

Sustainability Studies

Examine the complexities and conflicts in meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to do the same by minoring in Sustainability. You will grapple with an evolving area of inquiry that is gaining increasing interest from businesses, government agencies and non-governmental organizations around the world, and enhance your ability to critically think and advance solutions to issues that impact the environment, the economy and social equity.

The Sustainability minor, hosted in partnership with the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, requires the completion of 15 credits, including 1 core course, 1 approved course from each thematic area (Science and Technology, Policy and Institutions, and Social and Human Dimensions), and 3 credits from an approved course, internship, or study abroad experience. No course may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one minor, and no more than 6 credits may overlap between your major and the Sustainability minor. At least nine credits must be at the 300-400 level. 

You must complete the following course:

You must complete one approved course from each of three thematic areas:

  • Science and Technology
  • Policy and Institutions
  • Social and Human Dimensions

See the full list of approved courses that you can use to satisfy the thematic area course requirement.

See the full list of approved courses that you can use to satisfy the elective course requirement.

Experiential learning is an important part of the Sustainability Studies minor, which is why we have approved several study abroad courses for the minor. Studying abroad is a great, unique way to get hands-on experience and deepen your understanding of sustainability and what it means to different people and cultures around the world.

The Education Abroad Office has a list of all study abroad opportunities available on campus. Many of these study abroad trips can be used for the Sustainability Studies Minor. New programs are available every year, so keep your eyes open, and if you see a trip that fits your interests, let us know. We will work with you to get the most out of your time abroad.

 Contact us at susminor@umd.edu if you are interested in studying abroad for the minor. All courses must be pre-approved by the Sustainability Studies office for the course to count towards the completion of the minor.

What is Sustainability?

In 1987, the Brundtland Commission of the United Nations defined sustainable development as “Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. As sustainability professionals, we work to enact effective change within our disciplines and organizations to align with this development mindset. Our curriculum explores the many ways human activity supports or conflicts with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, as well as how we can more broadly embrace the Triple Bottom Line of social, economic, and ecological sustainability.

What can I do with a minor in Sustainability Studies?

Minors come from all different academic backgrounds, each pursuing their own professional and career goals. Fortunately, more sectors and disciplines are incorporating sustainability each year, and recognize the value of applicants with this background. Emerging fields include agriculture, architecture, business and economics, education, energy, wilderness conservation, and urban planning. The list doesn’t end there - tailor your studies to suit your interests!

Questions?

Contact us at susminor@umd.edu or visit us during office hours.